Psychology student survives the medically impossible, now giving people hope

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My faith is even stronger and I just feel like at this point if death couldn’t get me then what can?”

By: Essi Auguste Virtanen

When Trashon Perkins was first told she had a grapefruit sized tumor in her brain back in December 2014, and it would be likely she might not make it, she was willing to accept it.

She had lived 38 good years, she said, and even if her body might die, her soul and spirit will continue to live on.

But at that point, she said God appeared for her.

“I heard his voice and he told me – just like this – ‘Tray, I got you.’ He used my nickname and everything,” she said.

After that Perkins “spoke life” and told her doctors: “I’m gonna live. Period. I just need you all to take this [tumor] out of my brain because I’m not going anywhere.”

The doctors told her she would not be the same after the surgery, that it would take at least a year for her to learn basic cognitive skills like walking and talking. But Perkins remained confident through her faith.

“I told the doctors the moment I come off the anesthesia, I’m going to talk and I said the moment you are going to let me put my feet on the ground, I’m gonna walk,” she said.

And she did.

When the anesthesia wore off, she spoke and had the same cognitive knowledge as before the surgery. Two days later when she was taken to recovery, she was insistent to get out of bed.

“I stood up, I took about two or three steps and I took more steps and an hour later I was walking around the floor,” she said. “Just taking laps around the floor on Christmas Eve. It was amazing, even my neurologist came to see me, he saw me walking and started crying.”

Walking at that point being medically impossible, Perkins was a walking miracle.

She said surviving the surgery made her feel like a better person.

“My faith is even stronger and I just feel like at this point if death couldn’t get me then what can?”

Almost four years later, now 42-years-young, as she said herself, Perkins is a first-year master’s student in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at The Chicago School’s Los Angeles Campus, hoping to help people be the best they can and give them hope.

“There’s obviously something bigger than us here,” she said. “So we have to figure out how to tap into that, in order to make things better for ourselves and make lives better for others.”

In September, she started working as a case manager for a non-profit organization in Skid Row, to help the homeless to get their lives off the ground.

“I know God put me in this position,” she said. “I know, so I can encourage people and let them know ‘don’t give up.’”

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